Equine Excellence | Living the Equestrian Lifestyle

Buying an equestrian property is unlike any other real estate purchase, and owning it is unlike any other way of life. There is an emotional component, sometimes even an aspirational one.

Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty | Contact Bernie Uechtritz for more information

“It’s of one of great love,” says Paul Wooldridge of Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty in Dallas, Texas. “Love for life and for nature. We’ve found horse lovers are some of most passionate people in the world. They’re also very disciplined people and very hard working. The lifestyle is one of luxury but it’s not about having the right clothes or horse blankets or saddles.”

We’ve found horse lovers are some of most passionate people in the world.
Paul Wooldrige, Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty

While love for the animal drives the lifestyle, it takes more than passion. Maintaining a horse farm, even a small property for hobbyists, requires specific knowledge. Is there access to a water supply? Is the land too sloped or too marshy? What about the balance between the size of the property and ease of upkeep?

Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty | Contact Bernie Uechtritz for more information

Wooldridge’s office has a ranch and land division that specifically caters to equestrian property buyers. Most serious horse people come in already schooled on four-legged matters, he says, and many have a history with the equestrian lifestyle. “It’s in their blood.” Buyers already know whether they want a modest horse-friendly lot with a small barn, a weekend getaway with caretaker’s quarters or an iconic cowboy country trophy ranch on thousands of acres where horses can be stabled and run free. Wooldridge’s buyers come from California, Colorado, even Miami and the Northeast. It is often their second or third home. Demand for equestrian properties in Texas is strong. The state leads the country in horse population followed by California and Florida.

From sprawling grounds and professionally-outfitted stables to the Kentucky Derby, explore Equestrian properties on the Extraordinary Living blog

The characteristics that make for a particularly good location are based on personal preferences but typically involve an area having a range of horse properties to choose among, an extensive trail system, comfortable riding weather and a vibrant horse culture such as Lexington, Kentucky and Wellington, Florida.

Equestrian Sotheby’s International Realty | Contact David Welles for more information

The equine hub of Wellington is known as the Winter Equestrian Capital of the World. ”There’s a joke that Wellington is where people live on their horses,” says Thomas Baldwin of Equestrian Sotheby’s International Realty. The village hosts the 12-week long Winter Equestrian Festival, the largest and longest running horse show in the world, as well as other equestrian competitions and polo tournaments. Competition is performed at the highest levels. Olympic Trials for the U.S. Equestrian Show Jumping Team were held here.

Equestrian Sotheby’s International Realty | Contact David Welles for more information

Baldwin says that as in all real estate, location is extremely important.” The closer to competition venues, the better. Horse properties start at two acres and average around five per farm, Baldwin says. The majority of buyers are from the Northeast although Wellington draws a large international presence. Credit three major airports, all of which allow horses to be flown in and out, great weather and an elite community of equine aficionados.

No matter the location, equestrians have one thing in common: they love every single minute of the lifestyle, says Wooldridge. “They balance modern day living with the pure pleasures of nature.”

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Article provided exclusively by Iyna Bort Caruso

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